intervention  
 
London, 28 September 2012 – European Perspectives on Living in an Age of Austerity: Implications for Transatlantic Relations
28/09/2012
 
Yves Bertoncini, Secretary general of Notre Europe, will participate a one-day seminar organized by Chatham House in association with the US National Intelligence Council on “European Perspectives on Living in an Age of Austerity: Implications for Transatlantic Relations”.
Yves Bertoncini, Secretary general of Notre Europe, will participate to a one-day seminar organized by Chatham House in association with the US National Intelligence Council on “European Perspectives on Living in an Age of Austerity: Implications for Transatlantic Relations”, London, 28 September 2012.

 

09h00 Welcome and Introduction

 

09h15 Session 1 – The Changing

Political Economy of Europe

– Competing

European views about ‘austerity’ and ‘growth’

– Attitudes to the idea of deeper economic and fiscal integration

– How

structural are the economic divergences between the more and less competitive

economies of Europe?

 

10h45 Coffee

 

11h00 Session 2 – Politics in

austerity: The economic crisis and nationalist, populist and extremist parties

– How

are extremist and populist parties transitioning from an anti-immigrant to an

anti-EU focus and how successful is this proving?

– Are

there commonalities among populist and extremist movements across Europe?

– How

serious are the risks that extremism might move into forms of violence against

state actors and institutions or to terrorism, as in the 1970s?

– How

are ‘mainstream’ parties reacting?

 

13h00

Lunch

 

14h00-16h00

Session 3The Effects of the crisis on European foreign policy

– Impacts

of the austerity drive on European defence spending, prospects for EU defence

and security coordination, and impacts on the NATO alliance;

– Are

there signs that the crisis is affecting European foreign and security

policy-making?

– Are

there risks to the transatlantic alliance of growing European insularity?

– How

well placed is Europe to cope with rising powers, such as China, or complicated neighbours, such as Russia and Turkey? Are there risks of

divergence from US approaches?