Policy Paper 79
 
Le rôle du gaz dans la dimension exterieure de la transition énergétique européenne
Sami Andoura, Senior Research Fellow, Notre Europe - Jacques Delors Institute and Clémentine d'Oultremont, Researcher, Egmont ? As an economically attractive option for investors, a potential backup source for renewables and the cleanest fossil fuel, natural gas is expected to play an important role in the European transition towards a low-carbon economy by 2050. At a time when European primary energy resources are being depleted and energy demand is growing, natural gas is becoming increasingly important to the EU. Consequently, the gas import dependency of the EU will continue to grow significantly in the coming years. However, if the EU wants to achieve its energy transition by 2050, gas must be considered as a mid-term rather than a long-term solution.

The EU is facing important challenges linked to its gas policy both internally, by attempting to create a competitive, interconnected and well-functioning internal market for gas; and externally, by struggling to develop a coherent and collective external strategy, which would allow it to both diversify and secure its gas supply from abroad.
|   04/03/2013             |   Sami Andoura   |   Clémentine d'Oultremont             |   Energie et environnement
Policy Paper
 

Disponible en anglais uniquement


Ce Policy
Paper est une contribution de Sami Andoura (Notre Europe – Jacques Delors Institute) et Clémentine d’Oultremont (Egmont) au
projet Think Global – Act European (TGAE). Thinking Strategically
about the EU’s external action
dirigé par Notre Europe – Institut
Jacques Delors
(rapport disponible en mars 2013, dir. Elvire Fabry,
Chercheur Senior, Notre Europe – Institut Jacques Delors).

As an economically attractive
option for investors, a potential backup source for renewables and the cleanest
fossil fuel, natural gas is expected to play an important role in the European
transition towards a low-carbon economy by 2050. At a time when European
primary energy resources are being depleted and energy demand is growing,
natural gas is becoming increasingly important to the EU. Consequently, the gas
import dependency of the EU will continue to grow significantly in the coming
years. However, if the EU wants to achieve its energy transition by 2050, gas
must be considered as a mid-term rather than a long-term solution.

The EU is facing important
challenges linked to its gas policy both internally, by attempting to create a
competitive, interconnected and well-functioning internal market for gas; and
externally, by struggling to develop a coherent and collective external
strategy, which would allow it to both diversify and secure its gas supply from
abroad.

Meanwhile, new sources of
unconventional gas could change the world’s energy markets with potential
consequences for the EU. However, many uncertainties remain regarding the
development of unconventional gas within the EU, especially on negative
environmental and climate impacts.

In view of all these challenges, it is crucial that
the EU clarifies its strategy regarding gas in the aim of improving its
security of supply and pursuing its efforts against climate change. This paper
will conclude by laying out concrete recommendations on how the EU could
strengthen its strategy with regard to gas.

Avant la
publication du rapport final présentant les recommandations clés des16 think tanks mobilisés dans ce projet, 5 séries
de Policy Papers portent sur les sujets suivants : Migration, Voisinage de l’UE, PSDC,Ressources stratégiques et Politiques économiques (publication le 12 Mars).

Ce Policy Paper
fait partie de la série intitulée «Ressources Stratégiques de l’UE: quelle action extérieure européenne?» qui
comprend les contributions de Gonzalo Escribano (Elcano), Annika Ahtonen et Andrea Frontini (EPC), Nadège Chambon (Notre Europe – Jacques Delors Institute)et Stephen Tindale (CER).

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autres contributions de la série ressources stratégiques >>

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