Autres documents
 

Reaction of Pepper D. Culpepper and Archon Fung to Andrew Moravcsik’s article on the collapse of the Constitutional treaty

Crisply reasoned argumentation, even when it is dead wrong, is always welcome in the debate on the alleged crisis of democracy in the European Union. Andrew Moravcsik’s recent contribution is certainly well argued, and we agree wholeheartedly with his dismissal of the recent European Constitution as a legally unnecessary project driven primarily by public relations motives. His lessons for what we can learn from that debacle, however, are questionable.

|   02/10/2006             |   Archon Fung   |   Pepper Culpepper             |   Law and institutions
Autres documents

Crisply reasoned argumentation, even when it is dead wrong, is always welcome in the debate on the alleged crisis of democracy in the European Union. Andrew Moravcsik’s recent contribution is certainly well argued, and we agree wholeheartedly with his dismissal of the recent European Constitution as a legally unnecessary project driven primarily by public relations motives.

His lessons for what we can learn from that debacle, however, are questionable. We question two central elements in particular: its basis in empirical political science and the implications of those findings for questions of democracy.