Policy Paper 63
 

Strategic Priorities for EU Defence Policy

Daniel Keohane, Head of Strategic Affairs, FRIDE —
If the EU is to have an effective foreign policy in the future, it will need a clear sense of its strategic priorities, and what it is prepared to do through its Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). The combination of a more turbulent neighbourhood, the US re-balance toward Asia, the shift in global military power and their own deep defence budget cuts should encourage EU governments to cooperate more closely on defence matters. However, assessing how global military power is changing, and how that may impact upon European security and foreign policy interests deserves much more attention from EU governments. In future, alongside a geographic focus on Europe’s broad neighbourhood and helping to tackle some key threats to European security, CSDP should contribute to protecting vital European interests as well as projecting European values.

|   13/02/2013             |   Daniel Keohane             |   Europe in the world
Policy Paper

 

This Policy Paper is a contribution of Daniel Keohane (Fride) to the project Think Global – Act European (TGAE). Thinking strategically about the EU’s external action directed by Notre Europe – Jacques Delors Institute (report available in March 2013, dir. Elvire Fabry, Senior Research Fellow, Notre Europe – Jacques Delors Institute).

 

 

 

If the EU is to have an effective foreign policy in the future, it will need a clear sense of its strategic priorities, and what it is prepared to do through its Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). The combination of a more turbulent neighbourhood, the US re-balance toward Asia, the shift in global military power and their own deep defence budget cuts should encourage EU governments to cooperate more closely on defence matters. However, assessing how global military power is changing, and how that may impact upon European security and foreign policy interests deserves much more attention from EU governments.

In future, alongside a geographic focus on Europe’s broad neighbourhood and helping to tackle some key threats to European security, CSDP should contribute to protecting vital European interests as well as projecting European values.

 

 

 

Before the publication of the final report presenting the key recommendations of the 16 think tanks involved in the project, 5 series of Policy Papers address the following key challenges: CSDP, EU neighbourhood, strategic resources, migration and economic policy.

 

This Policy Paper is part of the series entitled “How can Europeans be taken seriously with lower hard capacities?” which includes contributions by Jean-Pierre Darnis (IAI, Rome), Ronja Kempin (SWP, Berlin), Nick Witney (ECFR, London) and Jan Techau (Carnegie Europe, Brussels). 

 
Go to the other contributions of the defence series >>

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